The University Medical Plaza

8401 Medical Plaza Drive Ste. 355

Charlotte, NC 28262

Phone: 877-624-5802

FAX: 888-974-1542



Join us for classes that match every level of experience.

LEARN MORE

      CLINICAL  NEWS  FROM  ST. LAZARUS

Get a glimpse of what we do at St. Lazarus Behavioral Health PC. in Charlotte, North Carolina by browsing through our online gallery. You will get to see our hardworking team as well as the happy faces of the kids and adults we have helped throughout the years.

THE  ST. LAZARUS  WEEKLY NEWS

Hispanic Youth Experience Higher Levels of Sadness, Hopelessness, Than Their Peers: 

from Al Dia Health  by  Emily Neil

We're celebrating Minority Mental Health Month in Clips, on Twitter, and on Facebook all month long!

According to the report, Hispanic students had a higher prevalence than white and black students of the risk behavior of having felt sad and hopeless, which Professor Hausmann-Stabile said is concerning because those feelings can be strong predictors of suicide risk.

Hausmann-Stabile noted that this most recent report is significant because “it is the first time that we have data of what is happening for the wellbeing of minorities in this country after [Trump’s election]” — a context which she said has greatly affected the mental health of Latinos and other minorities in the U.S.

“We already have emerging evidence of the effects on the mental health of children and families that are struggling or have been targeted by the rhetoric or policies,” said Hausmann-Stabile, citing a report released in March from George Washington University which showed that the political context after Trump’s election and inauguration has been affecting the wellbeing and health of Latino immigrant families and their children.

Check out AACAP's Facts for Families: Diversity and Culture in Child Mental Health Care.

Researchers find no difference between kids raised by two moms and kids raised by mom and dad

Los Angeles Times;  Melissa Healy

The kids aren’t kids anymore. And they’re still all right.

The children of a first generation of lesbian women to take family-building into their own hands and conceive children through sperm donation are young adults now. And on Wednesday, the New England Journal of Medicine published new findings from the first study to comprehensively track those children’s mental health trajectories and compare them to those of kids in other U.S. households.

At 25, these pioneers on the landscape of sexual minority were the same as they were reported to be when the same children were assessed at ages 10 and 17: They were just fine. In the new inquiry, 77 of these “index offspring” were compared to a sample of typical U.S. 25-year-olds matched on sex, race or ethnic background, and educational level.

Conclusion: The children of lesbians had no more behavioral or emotional problems than did a representative sample of kids their age. Their relationships with family, friends, spouses or partners functioned just as well. And they were no more likely to have diagnosable or near-diagnosable psychiatric disorders than were young adults who were like them in every respect but the sexual orientation of their parents.

Check out AACAP's Facts for Families: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Parents.

Black Therapists Explain the Stigma of Mental Health in Minority Communities

The Thirty by   Maya Allen

We're celebrating Minority Mental Health Month in Clips, on Twitter, and on Facebook all month long!

It's difficult to uproot the stigma therapy has in minority communities. It's difficult to evolve in a culture that believes prioritizing mental health is a sign of weakness. It's difficult to let go of the notion that you must be strong when dealing with trauma. But the epidemic of mental health in minority communities is a serious problem we cannot in good conscience continue to ignore.

For black teens ages 10 to 19, the rate of suicides is three times higher in males than in females. And let this statistic settle in: Black adolescents and young adults have the highest rate of suicide of any age group of blacks. Suicide was the third-leading cause of death among blacks ages 15 to 19, fourth among those ages 20 to 29, and eighth among those ages 30 to 39.

Check out AACAP's Facts for Families: Diversity and Culture in Child Mental Health Care.

AACAP Videos for Families

Click this text to start editing. This block is a basic combination of a title and a paragraph. Use it to welcome visitors to your website, or explain a product or service without using an image. Try keeping the paragraph short and breaking off the text-only areas of your page to keep your website interesting to visitors.

Our Recent Work

Video Title

Double-click the video to edit it and enter a short description of the video here.

Video Title

Double-click the video to edit it and enter a short description of the video here.

Video Title

Double-click the video to edit it and enter a short description of the video here.

Video Title

Double-click the video to edit it and enter a short description of the video here.

Video Title

Double-click the video to edit it and enter a short description of the video here.

Video Title

Double-click the video to edit it and enter a short description of the video here.

Click Here to Add a Title

Click this text to edit. Tell users why they should click the button.

Get in Touch